Connecting Your Biggest “Why” with Lyle Benjamin| UYGW048

Join Lyle Benjamin and Amanda as they discuss:

  • How to tap into your deepest, biggest “why” to build resilience
  • How Lyle overcomes hardship and creates meaning
  • Why 2023 is the year of one people, one planet

Resources:

Come to Amanda’s event on January 17th: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/474101469257

PlannedActs.Org,

LyleBenjamin.com,

TheWorkingDead.Us

SUMMARY

On this holiday episode of Unleashing YOUR Great Work, we are joined by Lyle Benjamin, an entrepreneur who is the founder of three (that’s right – THREE) non-profit organizations: 16 Things Kids Can Do, Planned Acts of Kindness, and One Planet, One People. Leaving his life as a lawyer behind, Lyle found he always had a debt to repay for the kindness he had been shown since a young age, even if that meant repaying his debts by helping the community and our very own planet. Lyle discovered his Great Work was in the world around him, and he believes that this decade alone is going to determine the quality of life for the people and the planet from here on out. But, much like all Great Work, our bodies, minds, and souls can take a harsh beating when pouring our full-forced energy into the world, and we find a lack of resilience and stamina once our energies have been depleted. What does Lyle recommend? BE KIND TO YOURSELF! Lyle trusts the saying “we can’t sweat the small stuff, “ and even though we may have many overwhelming things coming at us this holiday season, it’s important to think about perspective. Remember, it’s not about how much money you have, how many toys you get, or even how many eggnogs you drink…It’s about the quality of your relationships with other people and your sense of community that help you rebuild your Great Work resilience.

About the Guest:

My name is Lyle Benjamin and I am the founder of three Non-Profit Organizations, 16 Things Kids Can Do, Planned Acts of Kindness & One Planet One People. 

I didn’t start out wanting to change the world, I just wanted to repay a debt. 

When I was a child, I had a difficult family life at home. I started working when I was 11 years old just to get out of the house. I met people who took an interest in me, and I appreciated their acts of kindness so much that I went to law school with the goal of helping others. 

And boy was I naïve. After working with the NY Attorney General’s Office, I decided the profession wasn’t compatible with my goals. I left that behind and did many successful entrepreneurial businesses, but I felt I wasn’t doing enough to repay my debt.

So, I gave it all up and created the NPO Planned Acts of Kindness where I gamified Karma. But the world is in crisis and this decade is going to determine the quality of life for billions of people. 

I do speaking events and workshops about the collaborative steps individuals and institutions can take on a local, national, or global scale to push back on the tipping points issues as well as social, economic and health inequalities to provide quality of life for kids, people, and the planet. 

Like it or not we’re all in this together and I share more about the 40+ programs and initiatives people and institutions can use — based upon their own interests and causes — to “Be the Hero” in my book: “ONE: The Fight for Survival of the Human Race.” 

Programs include The Collaboration Think Tank Network; The Work/Life Balance Collaborative Course; Money Matters Mastery; HR Custom Benefits Programs; Education for Quality of Life; One Planet One People Clubs; One Table One World; The Great Pizza Peace Plan Challenge; Team-Building; Fundraising; Branding Opportunities. 

Additional Books:  The Working Dead; Legacy LifeLines: Memorial Edition; 16 Things We All Can Do to Act Right & Help Save the Planet. 

Lyle Benjamin — The Karma Guy /// 

PlannedActs.Org,

LyleBenjamin.com,

TheWorkingDead.Us

About the Host:

Dr. Amanda Crowell is a cognitive psychologist, speaker, podcaster, author of Great Work, and the creator of the Great Work Journals. Amanda’s TEDx talk: Three Reasons You Aren’t Doing What You Say You Will Do has received more than a million views and has been featured on TED’s Ideas blog and TED Shorts. Her ideas have also been featured on NPR, Al Jazeera, The Wall Street Journal, Quartz, and Thrive Global. Amanda lives in New Jersey with her husband, two adorable kids, and a remarkable newfiepoo named Ruthie. She spends her days educating future teachers, coaching accidental entrepreneurs, and speaking about how to make progress on Great Work to colleges and corporate teams. To book Dr. Crowell to speak or inquire about coaching, check out amandacrowell.com or email amanda@amandacrowell.com.

Website: amandacrowell.com

Book: https://www.amazon.com/Great-Work-Amanda-J-Crowell/dp/1737374196

Podcast: amandacrowell.com/podcast

IG: https://www.instagram.com/aj_crowell

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-amanda-crowell-51188130/

About Podapalooza

All of these resilience episodes were recorded during Podapalooza, an event that brings together podcast hosts and podcast guests to record episodes on the spot!

Learn more at https://podapalooza.com/

Thanks for listening!

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Transcript
Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Welcome, everybody to unleashing your great work on this special 10 episode series, we are focused on resilience. What is it? How do we get it? And if we've lost it, how do we get it back. So listen in, because we know that great work is so much more dependent on your resilience than it is on your hustle.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Welcome, everybody to unleashing your great work. Today on our special holiday episode, I'm super excited to have Lyle Benjamin on the podcast. As a child, Lyle had a difficult family life. When he started working at 11 years old just to get out of the house, he learned to appreciate the acts of kindness that others showed to him. And he went to law school with the goal of helping others. After working with the New York Attorney General's office, he left law behind and became a successful entrepreneur. And then the founder of three nonprofit organizations 16 things kids can do. Planned acts of kindness and one planet one people. Lyle knows that the world is in crisis, and that this decade is going to determine the quality of life for billions of people. Welcome to the podcast. Lyle.

Lyle Benjamin:

Well, thank you so much, Amanda. You know what you're doing is absolutely tremendous. And it's really well needed. So thank you for having me.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Yes, it's my pleasure. Well, Kyle, I would love there's so much in that bio that has me going but tell me more. So why don't we just start where we always do? Can you tell us a little bit about your great work?

Lyle Benjamin:

You know, I've always felt a debt of gratitude to the people who showed me so much kindness when they didn't have to when I was growing up, and it really saved me. So I made a decision early on that I couldn't repay them, but I can help other people. And that's why, like you mentioned I went to law school originally. But I found out I was very naive. Really about that. Unfortunately,

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

that's a bummer to find out after law school.

Lyle Benjamin:

Yeah, it's unfortunate. But you know, we live and learn, right? So the thing is that I've been on a mission, sometimes on and off to go ahead and repay that debt. Mm hmm. And I've created I was the publisher of a national newsstand magazine that was psychologically based in terms of helping people deal with all types of intimate relationships, intimate family friendship and work. Best Selling board game. I've done other other things in order to help people as as as well as I could. But also I was also doing entrepreneurial business. Although as successful at it, I realized I was really straying from the mission that God has given me.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Well, I just have to interject to ask what was the award winning or best selling board game,

Lyle Benjamin:

it was called romantic journey, an intimate evening, just for to, Oh, interesting. When you play the game, you record what you want to get from your partner, should you win the game, but there's no winners or losers, because just by playing the game, you both win. And what it does is it brings better communication to the relationship, better intimacy. And it's a really fun game as well.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

I bet it builds resilience. I'll have to put a link to it in the show notes so that we can encourage people to go check it out. But okay, back to the mission. You realized you were maybe a little off track. And then what happened?

Lyle Benjamin:after the election, or after:Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Karma, the karmic wheel, you gave it that,

Lyle Benjamin:ur rewards. And by the end of:Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Fascinating. Very, very cool. Thank you. And there's one more of these right?

Lyle Benjamin:

Well, there's actually a bunch of different programs. And, you know, one of the aspects of the karma club is how people can take individual responsibility. You know, when you think about volunteering over the holidays, what do you think about, you know, serving food in the soup kitchen giving out food in the pantry, cleaning apart doing a walkathon? Well, those things are great, but the thing is, they make you feel good. But they don't really go ahead and create life changing things for other people. Wouldn't it be great if you can go ahead and get an even better feeling by providing quality of life for yourself, your family, your future, and other people. And that's what we're inviting people to do, is to be more powerful than they ever could imagine. These people are really more connected than they think. So, you know, it doesn't matter whether you're interested in helping people with schools, right, or helping people with faith based or helping people in government or nonprofits or NGOs around the world, we're in business. There are ways that we've created because we have over 40 different programs that get into quality of life. So no matter where you want to go in order to help people no matter what part of the world no matter what illness, you want to go ahead. We have programs that are based on collaboration between individuals, influencers and institutions. Yes, you know, this decade is going to determine quality life, leads people on the planet.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And I like what you're saying about collaboration in, when we talk about great work as a concept, there are these four pillars of it. One is legacy, and one is your unique point of consciousness, like your unique expression of your life story, your ideas, your whatever. And one is that you do it in relationship with other people. Because like, so, like you were saying, like, it's this unsung hero of life, like, one of the interesting things we discovered. So the research that we were doing is that people really need community, but they will not pay for it. It's like this thing that they that we all really, really need, but can't quite for whatever reason admit to ourselves that we need. And yet it is the it's the magical elixir. It's the accelerant. It's the it's what makes it go viral. It's what makes it take off. It's what gives it actually teeth and force in the world. And so if we don't do it with other people, we're always limited in what we can accomplish, no matter how great your idea is, you can't do it on your own. So I love that about your nonprofit, I think it's it's really providing a mechanism for people to do that, which I think is great. Now, Lyle, I have to assume if you're running three nonprofits, that you get tired. So I'm wondering, one of the things we say on this podcast a lot is that this kind of work, great work, that work that pulls out of your soul, and is given to the world as you're offering as your legacy. It's kind of hard, it can be tiring, it's you're very emotionally connected to it. And it's easy to sort of lose your energy around it. And yet we know that great work is much more dependent on resilience than hard work. So we need some strategies here during the holidays. We've got a minute, we never have a minute. What can we do during this time to really sort of recharge and get to feeling back like ourselves again?

Lyle Benjamin:

Well, I think one of the things is that we have to be kind to ourselves. And, you know, we have to, as the saying goes, right? Not sweat the small stuff. Yeah. Okay. It's too, there's so many things coming at us that we have to deal with every day. And it's so easy to get overwhelmed and overwrought by it. I think that we've got to just step back, right? Do some breathing exercises, wait for a couple of minutes, and put it all into perspective. Because guess what, the next day? It's over with the next hour, right? It can be over with also, it's a question of, What is your mindset about how to deal with this. So at the same time, when you have all these stresses coming at you just understand where they're coming from, and let them go deal with them, let them go. You know, and if there's nothing you can do, because it's a Friday afternoon, and the place doesn't open till Monday, or the person you need, well, then don't spend the whole weekend worrying about it, let it go. Great. And, you know, one of the things that I did as a kid to deal with the craziness that was around me, is, I found a lot of joy in very, very small things. And that's all basically I had,

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

yeah, what's an example of a small thing you got some joy from? Uh huh.

Lyle Benjamin:

And I still do the same thing today. So, you know, it's not the two weeks vacation that I'm looking forward to? It's the conversations with you, Amanda, it's, you know, that's not that this is a small thing, right. But, you know, it's, it's the everyday things.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

What are some examples of small things that can recharge us in little, a powerful way?

Lyle Benjamin:

Oh, my goodness, it's, it's, it's the joy I get from actually looking and interacting with my cat. Who, who is upset when he's not included? In the conversations I have sometimes right in the other room, and he's the doors closed, and he's like, you're talking and you let me and you kept me out of the room. I'm like, Oh, my God, that's so funny. You know, so it's, it's the weirdest things, it's putting on a, you know, your favorite television show that you're watching currently, and just dropping everything. Right, it's getting, it's treating yourself to some of the food that you like, you know, as you know, with some caveats to that, but so it's the little things calling up a friend talking to a friend, you know, and those things have a lot more meaning in our lives sometimes than some of the bigger things that people are waiting for.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Right? Waiting to be happy. Yeah, I love that. I love I love that as a, almost like a daily practice of like, you know, release what you can. And when you're when you're just done. At the end of the day, start noticing what's around you the little cat, the the coffee, the the TV show, the clean sheets, clean sheet days, my favorite day of the week. I love that. But you know, sometimes you do sweat the small stuff. Sometimes you run too hard. You run into the ground. You start body hurts. You have y'all you want to be as done, you have you have no like interest in other people's perspective, right, like we all get there. What can we do in those moments? Or what do you do when you experience those moments to kind of find your way back to what is a pretty big mission?

Lyle Benjamin:ing on since the end of March:Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Yeah, I like that. I think I mean, we know from fMRI brain scans, right of people who think they can and think they can't, their brain acts completely differently. So I do think that there's a ton of truth in that. And I think when you were talking about cardiovascular fitness, right, there's also like, little victories, because when you first starting running, it's like running for a minute, you're like, Ah, no, sir. No.

Lyle Benjamin:

Yeah, that's not gonna happen.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

You have to celebrate that because and so sometimes I think you're right, like with burnout and other large problems, or any kind of like, chronic health issue. There's, like, you know, you sort of eke your way out of it. And what you really have to believe is like trusting yourself that you can build resilience, you can build a little more, stick to itiveness, or like, whatever the right words are. You damn it out? That's the word yes, you can build those things. And I think, also, I always, I always feel like, this is the missing piece. Like, it's like, also say to yourself, like this sucks. Like, really allow yourself to say that because I think sometimes we push through to past the point when we can do anything but feel woe is me, as opposed to like, sort of regulating ourselves and finding our finding our way through it and learning about ourselves and what our limits really are. And honoring those matters, too. It's very interesting. And not to put words in your mouth. But I have to believe that part of what is able to lift you up out of what's truly like, oh, man, I hope they figure that out. Is the fact that you have committed to and recommitted to and left behind expectations. And, you know, probably, you know, moving from like successful business to nonprofit is not usually a financial decision. Right? So

Lyle Benjamin:

not as smart when according to your family.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

Exactly. But you you've sort of laid your heart on the line. And that brings you back to it too. I think it's harder to live through hard times, if what you're doing it for hasn't truly isn't truly your great work. Yeah,

Lyle Benjamin:

that though that 100% 100 You know, it's the resistance. You know, if if you're not feeling it, your resistance crumbles. If you're feeling, right. It's a rock. Hmm,

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

fascinating. Well, I love it. So I want to give you a chance to tell us how we can support your work, because you probably need people to participate in the programs and share about it on social media tell us what we can do to support this amazing effort that you have underway.

Lyle Benjamin:

Thank you so much, Amanda. Yes. Well, you know, one of the things is, is get involved, you can volunteer and it doesn't matter how old you are, you can be 12 years old, you can be 112 years old, okay? And what we do is we listen to what you want, what your objectives, what's your passion. And then we're going to go ahead and provide you with pathways where you can collaborate through that passion in order to achieve objectives. And that's how we go ahead and beat back the issues that we're facing. Okay. So one of the ways that you can get in touch with us is through our web, we have different websites that our websites one is real simple. It's planned x.org. That's for planned acts of kindness.org. Another is one planet dash one people died calm, nice. And also, if you're interested in having me talk at, you know, one of your events or your school or faith, or nonprofit or government agency or business, we have Lyle benjamin.com. And even if you went to that one, you're going to find a lot of information about how you can go ahead and get involved. But we have an app which is based on planned acts of kindness. And if you get the app through our website, it has tremendous ways for you to find programs in order to be the hero. And our programs are really kind of amazing for a nonprofit, because most of them have, you know, one program, we have over 40 different programs. Wow. They're featured in a book that is coming out in, in January of next year,

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

very soon, when these right after the holidays,

Lyle Benjamin:right after the holidays, and:Dr. Amanda Crowell:

You're gonna give me all those links you I'm sure you already have, we will put them in the show notes. And I would just recommend, I think my recommendation would be go to at least one of these websites, find one thing that you can say you'll do and give it a shot and then find your way to the the rest of them. Because I think that getting involved seems to be the sort of primary foundational drive here. So you know, Lyle, thank you so much. I love your mission. I like your energy. I'm so happy to have had you on this holiday edition of unleashing your great work. I just want to thank you for the time that you spent with us and for the work that you're doing.

Lyle Benjamin:

Well, Amanda, it's been great. It's been a pleasure to be here. And I hope to speak to a lot of your audience, you know, over the holidays and into the new year. And together we can make things happen. Because we're talking about community before. Well, we got one planet, we got one people on the planet, and we got to start acting like it. So we got to collaborate to succeed. We got to collaborate.

Dr. Amanda Crowell:

It's time. It's time. All right. Thank you so much. Take care. Happy holidays.


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